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rj4gui4r:

Episode 13: Unafraid of the Dark, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

Neil DeGrasse Tyson throwing some of the most incredible shade I’ve ever seen.

(Source: child-of-thecosmos, via carazelaya)

Anonymous said: do you want to be famous?

lazenby:

In 1928 the architect Mies van der Rohe was commissioned to design a pavilion representing Weimar Germany at the 1929 International Exhibition in Barcelona. The building ended up becoming justly famous as the most eloquent definition of what was later gathered into Modernism. This definition would be something like, ‘Not only doing way more with way less, but becoming so good at it that you could thread a way out of the bewilderment and perversity which gnaw at modern lives of otherwise unparalleled bounty and convenience.’

The pavillion was designed to be doorless and mostly made of glass. In almost every way a building could be optimistic for the century it wanted to predict, this one was. The evidence for class oppression that great houses bear, like backstairs and basement kitchens are gone. Blank walls on which evidence of wealth could be displayed have been replaced by windows. Reality is the thing that transparent walls force your attention to confront. The pavillion even does away with the convention of a ‘front’ or a ‘back.’  Without a face on which to project how we want to be seen, duplicity becomes more difficult than simply being honest. The building hopes that without anything to hide behind, the very ideas of secrecy and guile will become too cumbersome to survive.

But in the very temple of delight. There was one place in the pavillion that showed a terrible shadow on the 20th century. Beyond the main room there was a reflecting pool. In the middle of the pool stood a statue of a nude woman. This choice to place a statue at a remove from anyone who would look at it is as elegant a definition as anything else in the building, but what is being defined is hideous. The fact that a statue has been taken out of the round and put in a position that allows only one point of view is an example of something our era has done on an industrial scale—the reduction of volumes to images. A statue by definition fills a volume, but limiting our perspective makes it flat. An image.

The act of reducing the freedom to see from whichever perspective suits you, down to only one, is as old as the allegory of the cave, where statues were reduced to their shadows. But the pavillion predicts that this process will come to dominate everything the statue represents: Art, diversion, beauty, and eventually, people themselves. All of us will buy, favor, love and appreciate from across an impassable distance. We will be segregated from everything we admire and from everything we want, because images are all we are presented with and flatness cannot be embraced.

Over and above every other example of this process is fame. If we are tricked by advertising into buying a phantom, wanting to be famous is wanting to become the phantom. It’s a desire that mistakes isolation for rarity, loneliness for exceptionality, and distance for height. The popular desire for fame is the crowning achievement of a hundred year campaign to iron out any aspect of being alive that calls for a complex and irreducible expression of humanity.

So no.

abaldwin360:

skepticalavenger:

atheistrose:

godlessmen:

The all wise, all powerful “God” as seen by rednecks…

I’d like to correct this:
“God, send us someone to cure AIDS, cancer, etc., etc.”
“I did, but you gave them a substandard education because they lived in an area with poor funding due to low property taxes.  I did, but you let them die because they couldn’t afford healthcare.  I did, but due to racism you stomped out their potential and didn’t give them the same opportunities.  I did, but you make a college education too unaffordable while giving the big bankers passes.  I did, but you saw a homeless youth before you saw a kid with potential.  I did, but you kicked the downtrodden while they were already shoulder deep in sinking sand.”

THIS COMMENT!!!!!  ^^^

YES! That comment!!!

abaldwin360:

skepticalavenger:

atheistrose:

godlessmen:

The all wise, all powerful “God” as seen by rednecks…

I’d like to correct this:

“God, send us someone to cure AIDS, cancer, etc., etc.”

“I did, but you gave them a substandard education because they lived in an area with poor funding due to low property taxes.  I did, but you let them die because they couldn’t afford healthcare.  I did, but due to racism you stomped out their potential and didn’t give them the same opportunities.  I did, but you make a college education too unaffordable while giving the big bankers passes.  I did, but you saw a homeless youth before you saw a kid with potential.  I did, but you kicked the downtrodden while they were already shoulder deep in sinking sand.”

THIS COMMENT!!!!!  ^^^

YES! That comment!!!

(via thefangirlfeminist)

nezua:

THE ONGOING SAGA OF THE FRAGILE WHITE

The Daily Show aired its long awaited segment on the Washington, D.C., NFL team name, in which fans were confronted by Natives on the set.
Before it even aired, the segment proved controversial. The satirical cable television news program had recruited team fans for the segment via Twitter; four were ultimately chosen to participate. But those participants told the Washington Post they felt like they were attacked.
Kelli O’Dell, who says it was unfair for The Daily Show to have her debate Amanda Blackhorse—the lead plaintiff in Blackhorse v. Pro-Football, Inc., which resulted in cancelling six of the team’s trademarks—says she felt like she was placed “in danger.” O’Dell later called authorities to pull The Daily Show tapes she had consented to appear on:

Two days later, O’Dell said she called D.C. police and tried to submit a police report, but authorities told her no crime had been committed.


People want their right to be racist. But the minute they approach facing real life consequences—and mild ones, given what they should expect for years of violence and slurs—look how they shake and cry. Look how they flee and fly to the po-lice, understanding fully the institutional role played by cops.

nezua:

THE ONGOING SAGA OF THE FRAGILE WHITE

The Daily Show aired its long awaited segment on the Washington, D.C., NFL team name, in which fans were confronted by Natives on the set.

Before it even aired, the segment proved controversial. The satirical cable television news program had recruited team fans for the segment via Twitter; four were ultimately chosen to participate. But those participants told the Washington Post they felt like they were attacked.

Kelli O’Dell, who says it was unfair for The Daily Show to have her debate Amanda Blackhorse—the lead plaintiff in Blackhorse v. Pro-Football, Inc., which resulted in cancelling six of the team’s trademarks—says she felt like she was placed “in danger.” O’Dell later called authorities to pull The Daily Show tapes she had consented to appear on:

Two days later, O’Dell said she called D.C. police and tried to submit a police report, but authorities told her no crime had been committed.

People want their right to be racist. But the minute they approach facing real life consequences—and mild ones, given what they should expect for years of violence and slurs—look how they shake and cry. Look how they flee and fly to the po-lice, understanding fully the institutional role played by cops.

(via stopwhitewashing)


(Source: brianbeavers, via spookyblackman)

beautifuleastafricanbrides:

Traditional Burundian newlyweds ❤️💎💚

liberalsarecool:

the-goddamazon:

solarsenpai:

thighetician:

arienreign:

Why isn’t anyone talking about this?
http://www.dailydot.com/news/darrien-hunt-shot-by-police-while-cosplaying/

Why is there a picture of Mugen from Samurai Champloo tossed in?

He was cosplaying as Mugen from Samurai Champloo with a picture on the left side for comparison.

People have BEEN talking about this since it happened, you’re just following the wrong people.

Follow the right people.

(via setdreadstostun)

iwishiwaspattismith:

Made some more stickers to put around campus and Santa Fe

(via milesjai)

"… My point is that the only authentic identity for the African is the tribe. I am Nigerian because a white man created Nigeria and gave me that identity. I am black because the white man constructed black to be as different as possible from his white. But I was Igbo before the white man came."

— Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Half of a Yellow Sun  (via ubahmadow)

(via ourafrica)

"Wilderson’s conception of the political ontology of race, outlined at the outset of this essay, helps us recognize the durable conflation of racial blackness as ‘categorical eligibility for enslavement,’ whether or not the institution of slavery has technically, legally, receded into the past (Sexton, 2010b, p. 37). As Wilderson’s concept explains, then, the racialized status of enslavement acts as if it were a metaphysical condition, despite constant contestation. A sampling of research across a variety of disciplines and contexts underscores the fact that this connection is by now a well-established verity, affirming that blackness is first and foremost a category of negation and fungibility, despite variations across time and place (compare Baucom, 2005; Davis, 2003; Eltis, 2000; Wacquant, 2002; Washington, 2008). In a famous passage, Fanon put it thus: “Ontology- once it is finally admitted as leaving existence by the wayside- does not permit us to understand the being of the black man …The black man has no ontological resistance in the eyes of the white man” (1952, p. 110). Fanon is sketching the paradigm of the anti-black world, which is grounded in the antirelation of blackness: that is, irrespective of formal political empowerment in the post-Civil Rights and post-independence period - leaving existence by the wayside- blackness signifies “the impossible subjectivity of a sentient being who can have no recognition in the eyes of the Other” (Wilderson, 2008, p. 103). Spillers enjoins this paradigm, writing that the socio-political order of the New World instantiates a political ontology in which the black body as a ‘captive body’ is branded as such from one generation to the next, “even though the captive flesh/body has been ‘liberated,’ and no one need pretend that even the quotation marks do not matter” (Spillers, 2003, p. 208)."

— Tyron P. Woods, “Surrogate selves: Notes on anti-trafficking and anti-blackness.” (via nica-nopal)

(via antiblacknessisatheory)

cinemakenya:

Kwaku Ananse Film Gets Nomination at 2013 African Movie Academy Awards (AMAA)!

Akosua Adoma Owusu, Ghanaian director and writer of the acclaimed short film Kwaku Ananse (which Ciné Kenya featured here), is thrilled to have her first narrative short nominated by the Africa Movie Academy Awards. The short film is a re-telling of the classic West African fable with a semi-autobiographical twist, featuring her uncle, Ghana’s legendary palm wine musician, Koo Nimo as Kwaku Ananse.

Owusu received this award after gaining international attention with her short films, Drexciya and Me Broni Ba, as well as from her work within the art world at the famed Studio Museum in Harlem. Read more.

(via ourafrica)

baconlyfe:

what the fuck do you want

baconlyfe:

what the fuck do you want

(Source: alpojones, via zeebeey)

byron130:

18.05.2014I learned yesterday that when you see a bee on the ground that isn’t moving, it’s not necessarily dead, it’s probably just dead tired from carrying lots of pollen and needs re-energising. So if you mix a tiny bit of water with some sugar and let it drink it will give it the boost it needs to continue on its way. Bizarrely, this exact thing happened today! I found a knackered bee, mixed up some sugar water, gave it a drink and watched it guzzle and guzzle then suddenly come back to life. It was amazing! Thank you patrick, it was an excellent tip that i’ll never forget and will continue to pass on to others!

byron130:

18.05.2014
I learned yesterday that when you see a bee on the ground that isn’t moving, it’s not necessarily dead, it’s probably just dead tired from carrying lots of pollen and needs re-energising. So if you mix a tiny bit of water with some sugar and let it drink it will give it the boost it needs to continue on its way. Bizarrely, this exact thing happened today! I found a knackered bee, mixed up some sugar water, gave it a drink and watched it guzzle and guzzle then suddenly come back to life. It was amazing! Thank you patrick, it was an excellent tip that i’ll never forget and will continue to pass on to others!

(via alientrashbaby)

(via milesjai)

fyblackwomenart:

"Kirikou and the Sorceress"

fyblackwomenart:

"Kirikou and the Sorceress"

(via ourafrica)